↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

The social network index and its relation to later-life depression among the elderly aged ≥80 years in Northern Thailand

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
Title
The social network index and its relation to later-life depression among the elderly aged ≥80 years in Northern Thailand
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s108974
Pubmed ID
Authors

Myo Nyein Aung, Saiyud Moolphate, Thin Nyein Nyein Aung, Chitima Kantonyoo, Songyos Khamchai, Pongsak Wannakrairot

Abstract

Having a diverse social network is considered to be beneficial to a person's well-being. The significance, however, of social network diversity in the geriatric assessment of people aged ≥80 years has not been adequately investigated within the Southeast Asian context. This study explored the social networks belonging to the elderly aged ≥80 years and assessed the relation of social network and geriatric depression. This study was a community-based cross-sectional survey conducted in Chiang Mai Province, Northern Thailand. A representative sample of 435 community residents, aged ≥80 years, were included in a multistage sample. The participants' social network diversity was assessed by applying Cohen's social network index (SNI). The geriatric depression scale and activities of daily living measures were carried out during home visits. Descriptive analyses revealed the distribution of SNI, while the relationship between the SNI and the geriatric depression scale was examined by ordinal logistic regression models controlling possible covariants such as age, sex, and educational attainment. The median age of the sample was 83 years, with females comprising of 54.94% of the sample. The participants' children, their neighbors, and members of Buddhist temples were reported as the most frequent contacts of the study participants. Among the 435 participants, 25% were at risk of social isolation due to having a "limited" social network group (SNI 0-3), whereas 37% had a "medium" social network (SNI 4-5), and 38% had a "diverse" social network (SNI ≥6). The SNI was not different among the two sexes. Activities of daily living scores in the diverse social network group were significantly higher than those in the limited social network group. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis models revealed a significant negative association between social network diversity and geriatric depression. Regular and frequent contact with various social contacts may safeguard common geriatric depression among persons aged ≥80 years. As a result, screening those at risk of social isolation is recommended to be integrated into routine primary health care-based geriatric assessment and intervention programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 20%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Psychology 10 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 17%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 16 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,114,265
of 11,420,953 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#712
of 1,160 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,198
of 264,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#31
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,420,953 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,160 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,203 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.