↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Tumor size interpretation for predicting cervical lymph node metastasis using a differentiated thyroid cancer risk model

Overview of attention for article published in OncoTargets and therapy, August 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
Title
Tumor size interpretation for predicting cervical lymph node metastasis using a differentiated thyroid cancer risk model
Published in
OncoTargets and therapy, August 2016
DOI 10.2147/ott.s107187
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ning Qu, Rong-liang Shi, Shu-wen Yang, Ben Ma, Zhong-wu Lu, Duo Wen, Guo-hua Sun, Yu Wang, Qing-hai Ji

Abstract

Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is common in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but management of clinically negative DTC is controversial. This study evaluated primary tumor size as a predictor of LNM. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for DTC patients who were treated with surgery between 2002 and 2012 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, to determine the association of tumor size at 10 mm increments with LNM. A predictive model was then developed to estimate the risk of LNM in DTC, using tumor size and other clinicopathological characteristics identified from the multivariate analysis. We identified 80,565 eligible patients with DTC in the SEER database. Final histology confirmed 9,896 (12.3%) cases affected with N1a disease and 8,194 (10.2%) cases with N1b disease. After the patients were classified into subgroups by tumor size, we found that the percentages of male sex, white race, follicular histology, gross extrathyroidal extension, lateral lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis gradually increased with size. In multivariate analysis, tumor size was a significant independent prognostic factor for LNM; in particular, the odds ratio for lateral lymph node metastasis continued to increase by size relative to a 1-10 mm baseline. The coefficient for tumor size in the LNM predictive model waŝ0.20, indicating extra change in log(odds ratio) for LNM as 0.2 per unit increment in size relative to baseline. In conclusion, larger tumors are likely to have aggressive features and metastasize to a cervical compartment. Multistratification by size could provide more precise estimates of the likelihood of LNM before surgery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 1 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 20%
Researcher 1 20%
Student > Master 1 20%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,112,850
of 8,219,010 outputs
Outputs from OncoTargets and therapy
#658
of 1,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#215,778
of 255,631 outputs
Outputs of similar age from OncoTargets and therapy
#31
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,219,010 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,022 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,631 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.