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Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings

Overview of attention for article published in HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.), January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 132)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
96 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
414 Mendeley
Title
Current strategies for improving access and adherence to antiretroviral therapies in resource-limited settings
Published in
HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.), January 2013
DOI 10.2147/hiv.s28912
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Vreeman, Scanlon

Abstract

The rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART) significantly reduced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related morbidity and mortality, but good clinical outcomes depend on access and adherence to treatment. In resource-limited settings, where over 90% of the world's HIV-infected population resides, data on barriers to treatment are emerging that contribute to low rates of uptake in HIV testing, linkage to and retention in HIV care systems, and suboptimal adherence rates to therapy. A review of the literature reveals limited evidence to inform strategies to improve access and adherence with the majority of studies from sub-Saharan Africa. Data from observational studies and randomized controlled trials support home-based, mobile and antenatal care HIV testing, task-shifting from doctor-based to nurse-based and lower level provider care, and adherence support through education, counseling and mobile phone messaging services. Strategies with more limited evidence include targeted HIV testing for couples and family members of ART patients, decentralization of HIV care, including through home- and community-based ART programs, and adherence promotion through peer health workers, treatment supporters, and directly observed therapy. There is little evidence for improving access and adherence among vulnerable groups such as women, children and adolescents, and other high-risk populations and for addressing major barriers. Overall, studies are few in number and suffer from methodological issues. Recommendations for further research include health information technology, social-level factors like HIV stigma, and new research directions in cost-effectiveness, operations, and implementation. Findings from this review make a compelling case for more data to guide strategies to improve access and adherence to treatment in resource-limited settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 414 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 <1%
Kenya 3 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 403 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 120 29%
Researcher 67 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 10%
Student > Bachelor 31 7%
Student > Postgraduate 28 7%
Other 80 19%
Unknown 46 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 150 36%
Social Sciences 57 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 47 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 3%
Other 68 16%
Unknown 66 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2013.
All research outputs
#1,605,132
of 11,346,162 outputs
Outputs from HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.)
#12
of 132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,096
of 311,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age from HIV/AIDS (Auckland, N.Z.)
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,346,162 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 132 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,561 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them