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A review of electroencephalographic changes in diabetes mellitus in relation to major depressive disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
A review of electroencephalographic changes in diabetes mellitus in relation to major depressive disorder
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, January 2013
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s38720
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anusha Baskaran, Roumen Milev, Roger S McIntyre

Abstract

A bidirectional relationship exists between diabetes mellitus (DM) and major depressive disorder (MDD), with depression commonly reported in both type 1 DM (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM), and depressive symptoms associated with a higher incidence of diabetes. However, how the two conditions are pathologically connected is not completely understood. Similar neurophysiological abnormalities have been reported in both DM and MDD, including elevated electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in low-frequency slow waves and increased latency and/or reduced amplitude of event-related potentials. It is possible that this association reflects some common underlying pathology, and it has been proposed that diabetes may place patients at risk for depression through a biological mechanism linking the metabolic changes of DM to changes in the central nervous system. In this review we will discuss EEG abnormalities in DM, as well as the biological mechanisms underlying various EEG parameters, in order to evaluate whether or not a common EEG biosignature exists between DM and MDD. Identifying such commonalities could significantly inform the current understanding of the mechanisms that subserve the development of the two conditions. Moreover, this new insight may provide the basis for informing new drug discovery capable of mitigating and possibly even preventing both conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 7 15%
Other 5 10%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Engineering 6 13%
Neuroscience 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2019.
All research outputs
#3,809,034
of 16,241,127 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#500
of 2,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,199
of 255,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#7
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,241,127 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,649 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.