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A longitudinal, event-related potential pilot study of adult obsessive-compulsive disorder with 1-year follow-up

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2016
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2 tweeters

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21 Mendeley
Title
A longitudinal, event-related potential pilot study of adult obsessive-compulsive disorder with 1-year follow-up
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s117100
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuhiko Yamamuro, Koji Okada, Naoko Kishimoto, Toyosaku Ota, Junzo Iida, Toshifumi Kishimoto

Abstract

Earlier brain imaging research studies have suggested that brain abnormalities in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) normalize as clinical symptoms improve. However, although many studies have investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in patients with OCD compared with healthy control subjects, it is currently unknown whether ERP changes reflect pharmacological and psychotherapeutic effects. As such, the current study examined the neurocognitive components of OCD to elucidate the pathophysiological abnormalities involved in the disorder, including the frontal-subcortical circuits. The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to evaluate 14 adult patients with OCD. The present study also included ten age-, sex-, and IQ-matched controls. The P300 and mismatch negativity (MMN) components during an auditory oddball task at baseline for both groups and after 1 year of treatment for patients with OCD were measured. Compared with controls, P300 amplitude was attenuated in the OCD group at Cz and C4 at baseline. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy treatment for 1 year reduced OCD symptomology. P300 amplitude after 1 year of treatment was significantly increased, indicating normalization compared with baseline at Fz, Cz, C3, and C4. We found no differences in P300 latency, MMN amplitude, or MMN latency between baseline and after one year of treatment. ERPs may be a useful tool for evaluating pharmacological and cognitive behavioral therapy in adult patients with OCD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 24%
Student > Bachelor 5 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Professor 1 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 33%
Neuroscience 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,127,062
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,540
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,335
of 267,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#71
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,128 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.