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Type 2 diabetes mellitus might be a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment progressing to Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Type 2 diabetes mellitus might be a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment progressing to Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s111298
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Li, Tao Wang, Shifu Xiao

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), so identification of the related risk factors can be helpful. Although the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and these modest changes in cognition is well established, whether T2DM will promote the transformation of MCI into AD is not a unified conclusion. This study aims to explore the relationship between T2DM and MCI in the elderly population living in the community in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. A total of 197 participants were included in the study. They were screened for T2DM, hyperlipidemia, traumatic brain injury, and family history of dementia. The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment were used to assess cognitive function. The diagnosis of AD was made according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, whereas the diagnosis of MCI was made according to Petersen's criteria. Then, we investigated the relation between T2DM and MCI. A total of 82 (41.6%) participants had no cognitive impairment, 82 (41.6%) participants had MCI, and 33 (16.8%) participants had AD. Multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated that T2DM was a risk factor for AD (odds ratio =49.723, 95% CI =21.173-111.987). T2DM might be a risk factor for MCI progressing into AD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Unspecified 4 9%
Other 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Psychology 7 16%
Unspecified 6 14%
Neuroscience 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Other 7 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2016.
All research outputs
#1,243,990
of 12,517,383 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#189
of 2,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,739
of 264,397 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#18
of 104 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,383 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,397 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 104 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.