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Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nanomedicine, April 2015
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162 Mendeley
Title
Magnetic particle imaging: current developments and future directions
Published in
International Journal of Nanomedicine, April 2015
DOI 10.2147/ijn.s70488
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos, Florian Vogt, Jörg Barkhausen, Thorsten M. Buzug, Robert L. Duschka, Kerstin Lüdtke-Buzug, Mandy Ahlborg, Gael Bringout, Christina Debbeler, Matthias Gräser, Christian Kaethner, Jan Stelzner, Hanne Medimagh, Julian Haegele

Abstract

Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a novel imaging method that was first proposed by Gleich and Weizenecker in 2005. Applying static and dynamic magnetic fields, MPI exploits the unique characteristics of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs' response allows a three-dimensional visualization of their distribution in space with a superb contrast, a very high temporal and good spatial resolution. Essentially, it is the SPIONs' superparamagnetic characteristics, the fact that they are magnetically saturable, and the harmonic composition of the SPIONs' response that make MPI possible at all. As SPIONs are the essential element of MPI, the development of customized nanoparticles is pursued with the greatest effort by many groups. Their objective is the creation of a SPION or a conglomerate of particles that will feature a much higher MPI performance than nanoparticles currently available commercially. A particle's MPI performance and suitability is characterized by parameters such as the strength of its MPI signal, its biocompatibility, or its pharmacokinetics. Some of the most important adjuster bolts to tune them are the particles' iron core and hydrodynamic diameter, their anisotropy, the composition of the particles' suspension, and their coating. As a three-dimensional, real-time imaging modality that is free of ionizing radiation, MPI appears ideally suited for applications such as vascular imaging and interventions as well as cellular and targeted imaging. A number of different theories and technical approaches on the way to the actual implementation of the basic concept of MPI have been seen in the last few years. Research groups around the world are working on different scanner geometries, from closed bore systems to single-sided scanners, and use reconstruction methods that are either based on actual calibration measurements or on theoretical models. This review aims at giving an overview of current developments and future directions in MPI about a decade after its first appearance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 159 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 30%
Student > Master 29 18%
Researcher 26 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Unspecified 12 7%
Other 33 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 44 27%
Physics and Astronomy 21 13%
Unspecified 19 12%
Chemistry 18 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 7%
Other 48 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2016.
All research outputs
#4,541,666
of 8,492,090 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#1,027
of 1,861 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,748
of 254,077 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#69
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,492,090 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,861 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,077 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.