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Deep analyses of the associations of a series of biomarkers with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes risk in nondiabetic middle-aged and elderly individuals: results from a Chinese…

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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20 Mendeley
Title
Deep analyses of the associations of a series of biomarkers with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes risk in nondiabetic middle-aged and elderly individuals: results from a Chinese community-based study
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s109583
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shihui Fu, Ping Ping, Leiming Luo, Ping Ye

Abstract

The current study was designed to perform deep analyses of the associations of biomarkers, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and homocysteine (Hcy), with insulin resistance (IR), metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes risk and evaluate the abilities of biomarkers to identify IR, MetS, and diabetes risk in Chinese community-dwelling middle-aged and elderly residents. A total of 396 participants older than 45 years underwent physical examinations and laboratory analyses following standardized protocol. Serum hs-CRP concentrations were able to identify MetS, Chinese diabetes risk score (CDRS) ≥4, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) <0.9/1.0 mmol/L, and HDL-c <1.0/1.3 mmol/L (P<0.05 for all). Serum NT-proBNP concentrations were able to identify homeostasis model assessment of IR >1.5, CDRS ≥4, overweight, and blood pressure (BP) ≥140/90 mmHg (P<0.05 for all). Serum Hcy concentrations were able to identify CDRS ≥4, general obesity, overweight, and BP ≥140/90 mmHg (P<0.05 for all). Serum hs-CRP concentrations were independently associated with MetS as well as HDL-c <1.0/1.3 mmol/L and HDL-c <0.9/1.0 mmol/L (P<0.05 for all). Serum NT-proBNP concentrations were independently associated with BP ≥140/90 mmHg (P<0.05). Serum Hcy concentrations were independently associated with CDRS ≥4 (P<0.05). Serum HDL-c levels were the major determinant of the associations between serum hs-CRP levels and MetS and the key link between inflammation and MetS. There was no other association of these biomarkers with IR, MetS, and diabetes risk after full adjustment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 30%
Other 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 4 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2016.
All research outputs
#6,523,542
of 8,594,027 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#823
of 1,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,914
of 247,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#37
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,594,027 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,025 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,316 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.