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Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
Title
Possibility of leg muscle hypertrophy by ambulation in older adults: a brief review
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2013
DOI 10.2147/cia.s43837
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takashi Abe, Ozaki, Loenneke, Thiebaud, Stager

Abstract

It is known that ambulatory exercises such as brisk walking and jogging are potent stimuli for improving aerobic capacity, but it is less understood whether ambulatory exercise can increase leg muscle size and function. The purpose of this brief review is to discuss whether or not ambulatory exercise elicits leg muscle hypertrophy in older adults. Daily ambulatory activity with moderate (>3 metabolic equivalents [METs], which is defined as the ratio of the work metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate) intensity estimated by accelerometer is positively correlated with lower body muscle size and function in older adults. Although there is conflicting data on the effects of short-term training, it is possible that relatively long periods of walking, jogging, or intermittent running for over half a year can increase leg muscle size among older adults. In addition, slow-walk training with a combination of leg muscle blood flow restriction elicits muscle hypertrophy only in the blood flow restricted leg muscles. Competitive marathon running and regular high intensity distance running in young and middle-aged adults may not produce leg muscle hypertrophy due to insufficient recovery from the damaging running bout, although there have been no studies that have investigated the effects of running on leg muscle morphology in older subjects. It is clear that skeletal muscle hypertrophy can occur independently of exercise mode and load.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Portugal 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 107 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 23%
Student > Bachelor 21 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 5%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 15 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 43 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 21 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2014.
All research outputs
#1,201,445
of 8,008,187 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#178
of 967 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,699
of 118,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#4
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,008,187 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 967 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 118,599 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.