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Distinguishing between attention-deficit hyperactivity and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in children: clinical guidelines

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
26 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
67 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
121 Mendeley
Title
Distinguishing between attention-deficit hyperactivity and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in children: clinical guidelines
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, August 2010
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s7256
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth Peadon

Abstract

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are the physical and neurodevelopmental outcomes of fetal alcohol exposure. The behavioral phenotype of children with FASD includes difficulties with executive function, memory, planning, processing speed, and attention. Although attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is diagnosed in up to 94% of individuals with heavy prenatal alcohol exposure, the exact relationship between FASD and ADHD is unclear. There is some evidence that ADHD in FASD may be a specific clinical subtype and thus may require a different treatment approach. Although traditional behavioral observation scales may not distinguish between the two groups, there is evidence that children with FASD have a different profile on the four-factor model of attention than children with ADHD who do not have FASD. There is a paucity of good scientific evidence on effective interventions for individuals with ADHD and FASD. There is weak evidence that children with FASD and ADHD may have a better response to dexamphetamine than methylphenidate. There is a strong need for larger, high quality studies to examine the relationship between ADHD and FASD and identify effective treatments because management of inattention and hyperactivity may improve learning and ameliorate the common secondary disabilities associated with FASD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 115 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 26 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 19%
Student > Master 15 12%
Researcher 9 7%
Other 8 7%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 17 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 37 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 17%
Neuroscience 11 9%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 25 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2019.
All research outputs
#731,338
of 21,173,427 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#81
of 2,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,457
of 174,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#4
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,173,427 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,285 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.