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Sex differences in the course of schizophrenia across diverse regions of the world

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, November 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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47 Mendeley
Title
Sex differences in the course of schizophrenia across diverse regions of the world
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, November 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s101151
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diego Novick, William Montgomery, Tamas Treuer, Maria Victoria Moneta, Josep Maria Haro

Abstract

This study explores sex differences in the outcomes of patients with schizophrenia (clinical/functional remission and recovery) across diverse regions of the world (Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and North Africa and the Middle East). Data (n=16,380 for this post hoc analysis) were taken from the World-Schizophrenia Health Outcomes Study. In most regions, females had a later age at first service contact for schizophrenia, a lower level of overall/negative symptom severity, lower rates of alcohol/substance abuse and paid employment, and higher percentages of having a spouse/partner and independent living. Overall, females had slightly higher rates of clinical remission (58.0% vs 51.8%), functional remission (22.8% vs 16.0%), and recovery (16.5% vs 16.0%) at 36 months (P<0.001 for all). This pattern was consistently observed in Southern Europe and Northern Europe even after controlling for baseline sex differences, but not in other regions. In Central and Eastern Europe, rates of clinical remission were higher in females at 36 months, but those of functional remission and recovery were similar between males and females. The opposite was observed for Latin America. In East Asia, sex differences were rarely observed for these outcomes. Finally, in North Africa and the Middle East, sex differences in these outcomes were pronounced only in regression analyses. These regional variations shed light on the importance of psychosocial and cultural factors and their effects on sex in the prognosis of schizophrenia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 19%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 16 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2016.
All research outputs
#11,519,723
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,810
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,700
of 237,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#71
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,265 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.