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Lithium and neuroprotection: translational evidence and implications for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
68 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
93 Mendeley
Title
Lithium and neuroprotection: translational evidence and implications for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2013
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s33086
Pubmed ID
Authors

Breno Diniz, Rodrigo Machado-Vieira, Forlenza

Abstract

In the last two decades, a growing body of evidence has shown that lithium has several neuroprotective effects. Several neurobiological mechanisms have been proposed to underlie these clinical effects. Evidence from preclinical studies suggests that neuroprotection induced by lithium is mainly related to its potent inhibition of the enzyme glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and its downstream effects, ie, reduction of both tau protein phosphorylation and amyloid-β42 production. Additional neuroprotective effects include increased neurotrophic support, reduced proinflammatory status, and decreased oxidative stress. More recently, neuroimaging studies in humans have demonstrated that chronic use is associated with cortical thickening, higher volume of the hippocampus and amygdala, and neuronal viability in bipolar patients on lithium treatment. In line with this evidence, observational and case registry studies have shown that chronic lithium intake is associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease in subjects with bipolar disorder. Evidence from recent clinical trials in patients with mild cognitive impairment suggests that chronic lithium treatment at subtherapeutic doses can reduce cerebral spinal fluid phosphorylated tau protein. Overall, convergent lines of evidence point to the potential of lithium as an agent with disease modifying properties in Alzheimer's disease. However, additional long-term studies are necessary to confirm its efficacy and safety for these patients, particularly as chronic intake is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 89 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 17%
Student > Master 14 15%
Researcher 14 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Postgraduate 11 12%
Other 21 23%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 26%
Psychology 12 13%
Neuroscience 10 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2017.
All research outputs
#841,171
of 9,264,233 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#139
of 1,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,663
of 122,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#6
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,264,233 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,775 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,596 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.