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Transcranial direct current stimulation improves the QT variability index and autonomic cardiac control in healthy subjects older than 60 years

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, November 2016
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Title
Transcranial direct current stimulation improves the QT variability index and autonomic cardiac control in healthy subjects older than 60 years
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, November 2016
DOI 10.2147/cia.s116194
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gianfranco Piccirillo, Cristina Ottaviani, Claudia Fiorucci, Nicola Petrocchi, Federica Moscucci, Claudia Di Iorio, Fabiola Mastropietri, Ilaria Parrotta, Matteo Pascucci, Damiano Magrì

Abstract

Noninvasive brain stimulation technique is an interesting tool to investigate the causal relation between cortical functioning and autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses. The objective of this report is to evaluate whether anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the temporal cortex influences short-period temporal ventricular repolarization dispersion and cardiovascular ANS control in elderly subjects. In 50 healthy subjects (29 subjects younger than 60 years and 21 subjects older than 60 years) matched for gender, short-period RR and systolic blood pressure spectral variability, QT variability index (QTVI), and noninvasive hemodynamic data were obtained during anodal tDCS or sham stimulation. In the older group, the QTVI, low-frequency (LF) power expressed in normalized units, the ratio between LF and high-frequency (HF) power, and systemic peripheral resistances decreased, whereas HF power expressed in normalized units and α HF power increased during the active compared to the sham condition (P<0.05). In healthy subjects older than 60 years, tDCS elicits cardiovascular and autonomic changes. Particularly, it improves temporal ventricular repolarization dispersion, reduces sinus sympathetic activity and systemic peripheral resistance, and increases vagal sinus activity and baroreflex sensitivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 15%
Neuroscience 5 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 12 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2016.
All research outputs
#13,180,709
of 16,587,222 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#1,240
of 1,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#272,134
of 388,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#35
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,587,222 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,565 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,343 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.