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Habitual coffee consumption and blood pressure: An epidemiological perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Vascular Health and Risk Management, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 629)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Habitual coffee consumption and blood pressure: An epidemiological perspective
Published in
Vascular Health and Risk Management, October 2008
DOI 10.2147/vhrm.s3055
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marianne Geleijnse

Abstract

This paper summarizes the current epidemiological evidence on coffee consumption in relation to blood pressure (BP) and risk of hypertension. Data from cross-sectional studies suggest an inverse linear or U-shaped association of habitual coffee use with BP in different populations. Prospective studies suggest a protective effect of high coffee intake (4 or more cups per day) against hypertension, mainly in women. Furthermore, the risk of hypertension may be lower in coffee abstainers. Randomized controlled trials, which are mostly of short duration (1-12 weeks), have shown that coffee intake around 5 cups per day causes a small elevation in BP (approximately 2/1 mmHg) when compared to abstinence or use of decaffeinated coffee. With regard to underlying biological mechanisms, most research has been devoted to BP-raising effects of caffeine. However, there are many other substances in coffee, such as polyphenols, soluble fibre and potassium, which could exert a beneficial effect in the cardiovascular system. Although the precise nature of the relation between coffee and BP is still unclear, most evidence suggests that regular intake of caffeinated coffee does not increase the risk of hypertension.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 121 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 38 30%
Student > Master 22 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 11%
Researcher 10 8%
Other 9 7%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 9%
Psychology 8 6%
Engineering 6 5%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 13 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2020.
All research outputs
#1,059,657
of 16,510,211 outputs
Outputs from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#21
of 629 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,984
of 159,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#1
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,510,211 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 629 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,767 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.