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Epidemiology of Chikungunya fever outbreak in Western Jamaica during July–December 2014

Overview of attention for article published in Research and reports in tropical medicine, January 2017
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
Title
Epidemiology of Chikungunya fever outbreak in Western Jamaica during July–December 2014
Published in
Research and reports in tropical medicine, January 2017
DOI 10.2147/rrtm.s122032
Pubmed ID
Authors

Phuong Pham, LaQueena Williams, Uduak Obot, Luz Padilla, Maung Aung, Tomi Akinyemiju, April Carson, Pauline Jolly

Abstract

Our study describes the 2014 Chikungunya outbreak in Western Jamaica in terms of geographic distribution and trend of the outbreak over time, and evaluates clinical symptoms of the disease based on pre-existing conditions. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study of 609 clinically defined Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) fever cases that occurred in the four parishes of the Western Regional Health Authority of Jamaica from July 2014 to December 2014. Cases were not confirmed by laboratory tests but met clinical and epidemiological criteria of CHIKV fever. Our results show a propagated spread of CHIKV fever during the outbreak period with the peak at the end of October. Main urban cities, such as Montego Bay and Lucea, were identified as places that had high numbers of cases. Fever and arthralgia were the two most common clinical symptoms in CHIKV patients. Although a majority (80%) of infants aged <2 years had up to four symptoms (80%), the percentage of infants with higher numbers of symptoms (9-10) was higher than in older age groups. However, back pain was found to occur significantly more in older patients. Those with arthritis as a pre-existing condition were more likely to experience headache, asthenia, back pain, and periarticular edema. These findings can help public health officials develop more effective programs to prevent the spread of CHIKV outbreaks by focusing on crowded urban cities. The findings indicate that those who are likely to develop a higher number of symptoms, such as young infants and people with pre-existing conditions, such as arthritis, should be more closely monitored to better manage the disease outcome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 40%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Arts and Humanities 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,804,377
of 12,439,436 outputs
Outputs from Research and reports in tropical medicine
#30
of 44 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,982
of 335,045 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Research and reports in tropical medicine
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,439,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 44 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one scored the same or higher as 14 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,045 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.