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Use of transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of auditory hallucinations of schizophrenia – a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
161 Mendeley
Title
Use of transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of auditory hallucinations of schizophrenia – a systematic review
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, February 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s122016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro Ponde, Eduardo de Sena, Joan Camprodon, Arao Araujo, Mario Ferrari-Neto, DiBiasi Melany, Abrahão Baptista, Lídia Moura, Camila Cosmo

Abstract

Auditory hallucinations are defined as experiences of auditory perceptions in the absence of a provoking external stimulus. They are the most prevalent symptoms of schizophrenia with high capacity for chronicity and refractoriness during the course of disease. The transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) - a safe, portable, and inexpensive neuromodulation technique - has emerged as a promising treatment for the management of auditory hallucinations. The aim of this study is to analyze the level of evidence in the literature available for the use of tDCS as a treatment for auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia. A systematic review was performed, searching in the main electronic databases including the Cochrane Library and MEDLINE/PubMed. The searches were performed by combining descriptors, applying terms of the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) of Descriptors of Health Sciences and descriptors contractions. PRISMA protocol was used as a guide and the terms used were the clinical outcomes ("Schizophrenia" OR "Auditory Hallucinations" OR "Auditory Verbal Hallucinations" OR "Psychosis") searched together ("AND") with interventions ("transcranial Direct Current Stimulation" OR "tDCS" OR "Brain Polarization"). Six randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of tDCS on the severity of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients were selected. Analysis of the clinical results of these studies pointed toward incongruence in the information with regard to the therapeutic use of tDCS with a view to reducing the severity of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia. Only three studies revealed a therapeutic benefit, manifested by reductions in severity and frequency of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenic patients. Although tDCS has shown promising results in reducing the severity of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenic patients, this technique cannot yet be used as a therapeutic alternative due to lack of studies with large sample sizes that portray the positive effects that have been described.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 161 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 161 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 72 45%
Student > Master 19 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Other 9 6%
Student > Postgraduate 7 4%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 17 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 58 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 21%
Neuroscience 17 11%
Psychology 11 7%
Unspecified 3 2%
Other 16 10%
Unknown 22 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2017.
All research outputs
#8,186,148
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,098
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,969
of 350,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#34
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.