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Does urinary peptide content differ between COPD patients with and without inherited alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, March 2017
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Title
Does urinary peptide content differ between COPD patients with and without inherited alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency?
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/copd.s125240
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alfonso Carleo, Joanna Chorostowska-Wynimko, Thomas Koeck, Harald Mischak, Małgorzata Czajkowska-Malinowska, Adriana Rozy, Tobias Welte, Sabina Janciauskiene

Abstract

Differentiating between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with normal (PiMM) or deficient (PiZZ) genetic variants of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) is important not only for understanding the pathobiology of disease progression but also for improving personalized therapies. This pilot study aimed to investigate whether urinary peptides reflect the A1AT-related phenotypes of COPD. Urine samples from 19 clinically stable COPD cases (7 PiMM and 12 PiZZ A1AT) were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We identified 66 peptides (corresponding to 36 unique proteins) that differed between PiZZ and PiMM COPD. Among these, peptides from the collagen family were the most abundant and divergent. A logistic regression model based on COL1A1 or COL5A3 peptides enabled differentiation between PiMM and PiZZ groups, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 85.71% for COL1A1 and a sensitivity of 91.67% and specificity of 85.71% for COL5A3. Furthermore, patients with PiZZ presented low levels of urinary peptides involved in lipoproteins/lipids and retinoic acid metabolism, such as apolipoprotein A-I and C4, retinol-binding protein 4 and prostaglandin-H2 D-isomerase. However, peptides of MDS1 and EVII complex locus, gelsolin and hemoglobin alpha were found in the urine of COPD cases with PiZZ, but not with PiMM. These capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry-based results provide the first evidence that urinary peptide content differs between PiMM and PiZZ patients with COPD.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Student > Master 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Professor 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 33%
Computer Science 1 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,669,965
of 9,189,847 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#836
of 1,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,565
of 253,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#51
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,189,847 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,205 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,676 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.