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An autopsy case of pulmonary fissure induced by zygomycosis

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, July 2013
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Title
An autopsy case of pulmonary fissure induced by zygomycosis
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, July 2013
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s44701
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susumu Ikehara, Imai, Adachi, Kimura, Nakano, Toshiki Shimizu, Shi, Okigaki, Shimo, Kaneko

Abstract

For immunodeficient patients, fungi are life-threatening pathogens. In this paper, we present an autopsy case of combined zygomycosis and aspergillosis. A female in her 70s on chronic hemodialysis was admitted to a hospital suffering bloody sputum, dyspnea, and fever, probably due to perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related vasculitis. Antibiotics were administered and immunosuppressive therapy was started, resulting in an improvement in her condition. Pneumonia later developed, followed by pulmonary bleeding and intractable pneumothorax from which she ultimately died. On autopsy, the upper lobe of the left lung was found to have hemorrhagic necrosis and showed a large longitudinal fissure. Microscopically, Zygomycota were observed in both the lungs and heart, while Aspergillus was found in the middle lobe of the right lung. Zygomycosis, which usually has a poor prognosis, is assumed to have induced hemorrhagic infarction of the lungs, inducing pulmonary bleeding and necrosis, despite the use of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, which are effective medicines against Zygomycota.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 14%
Other 3 14%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 7 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 77%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2013.
All research outputs
#5,295,259
of 6,230,503 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#224
of 303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,356
of 104,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#12
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,230,503 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 303 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.