↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

The effectiveness of a basic exercise intervention to improve strength and balance in women with osteoporosis

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
320 Mendeley
Title
The effectiveness of a basic exercise intervention to improve strength and balance in women with osteoporosis
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s127233
Pubmed ID
Authors

Montserrat Otero, Izaro Esain, Ángel M González-Suarez, Susana M Gil

Abstract

To determine the effects of a simple exercise program on the balance and strength of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. This program was based on low intensity strength and balance exercises, and was carried out with simple, readily available equipment. Sixty five women were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (EG; n=33, age: 57.4±4.8 years) or the control group (CG; n=32, age: 58.8±4.5 years). Participants in the EG underwent balance and strength training for 60 min, three times/week for 6 months. Each session consisted of warm-up exercises (10 min), balance training (20 min), strength training (20 min), and cooldown (10 min). Participants from the CG were asked not to modify their usual habits during the course of the study. Static balance was evaluated using the blind monopodal stance static balance test. In contrast, dynamic balance was assessed using the "8-foot up and go" test, whereas the strength of the upper and lower limbs was measured using the "arm curl" and "30 s chair stand" tests, respectively. All these variables were assessed at baseline and upon program completion. The EG showed significant improvements (P<0.001) in static balance (21%), dynamic balance (36%), and in the strength of the upper (80%) and lower (47%) limbs in comparison to the CG after the sixth month. Participants in the CG showed significantly lower values (P<0.001) in the four tests. In addition, a significant inverse relationship between static balance and the strength of the upper (r=-0.390; P=0.001) and lower (r=-0.317; P=0.01) limbs was found. The present study demonstrates that a physical exercise program based on balance and strength exercises, carried out with simple and readily available equipment, is capable of significantly improving the strength and balance of women with osteoporosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 320 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 320 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 68 21%
Student > Master 33 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 5%
Student > Postgraduate 15 5%
Other 54 17%
Unknown 114 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 60 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 55 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 12%
Social Sciences 6 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 1%
Other 23 7%
Unknown 134 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 January 2019.
All research outputs
#7,261,612
of 14,173,688 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#618
of 1,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,849
of 258,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#22
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,173,688 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,436 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.