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Comorbidity of Kawasaki disease and group A streptococcal pleural effusion in a healthy child: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, July 2013
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1 tweeter

Citations

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9 Mendeley
Title
Comorbidity of Kawasaki disease and group A streptococcal pleural effusion in a healthy child: a case report
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, July 2013
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s49510
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohamed Hendaus, Ahmed Alhammadi

Abstract

Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting vasculitis that affects children. The most dreaded complication of Kawasaki disease reported in the literature over the years is coronary artery disease, which is considered as the main cause of acquired heart disease. However, pulmonary associations with Kawasaki disease have been overlooked. We present a rare, if not unique, case of Kawasaki disease associated with group A streptococcus pleural effusion in the English language literature. A search of the PubMed database was carried out, using a combination of the terms "Kawasaki disease", "pneumonia", and "group A streptococcus". The majority of studies conducted in children with Kawasaki disease have concentrated on the coronary artery implications. Kawasaki disease is considered a self-limiting illness, but can have detrimental consequences if not diagnosed early. When there is a prolonged inflammatory reaction, with no infectious agent identified or remittent fever unresponsive to antibiotics, Kawasaki disease should be taken into consideration. Elevated Vβ2+ T cells compared with healthy controls suggest possible involvement of a superantigen in the etiology of Kawasaki disease, so it is wise that the health care provider concentrates not only on the cardiac consequences, but also on pulmonary associations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 33%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 11%
Unknown 4 44%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 11%
Unknown 4 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2013.
All research outputs
#3,561,848
of 4,507,280 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#197
of 273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,282
of 98,200 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#10
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,280 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 273 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,200 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.