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Effect of the sun on visible clinical signs of aging in Caucasian skin

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 433)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
184 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
2 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
94 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
Title
Effect of the sun on visible clinical signs of aging in Caucasian skin
Published in
Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology, September 2013
DOI 10.2147/ccid.s44686
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frederic Flament, Roland Bazin, Rubert, Simonpietri, Bertrand Piot, Laquieze

Abstract

AGING SIGNS CAN BE CLASSIFIED INTO FOUR MAIN CATEGORIES: wrinkles/texture, lack of firmness of cutaneous tissues (ptosis), vascular disorders, and pigmentation heterogeneities. During a lifetime, skin will change in appearance and structure not only because of chronological and intrinsic processes but also due to several external factors such as gravity, sun and ultraviolet exposure, and high levels of pollution; or lifestyle factors that have important and obvious effects on skin aging, such as diet, tobacco, illness, or stress. The effect of these external factors leads to progressive degradations of tegument that appear with different kinetics. The aim of this study was to clinically quantify the effect of sun exposure on facial aging in terms of the appearance of new specific signs or in terms of increasing the classical signs of aging.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 184 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 156 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 17%
Student > Master 28 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 10%
Student > Bachelor 15 9%
Other 13 8%
Other 30 19%
Unknown 31 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 46 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 7%
Chemistry 6 4%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 34 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 311. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2021.
All research outputs
#56,845
of 17,121,505 outputs
Outputs from Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology
#6
of 433 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#494
of 175,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,121,505 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 433 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 175,620 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.