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Advances in the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: the role of pegylated interferon β-1a

Overview of attention for article published in Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease, March 2017
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1 tweeter

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22 Mendeley
Title
Advances in the treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: the role of pegylated interferon β-1a
Published in
Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/dnnd.s71986
Pubmed ID
Authors

Furber, Kendra L, Van Agten, Marina, Evans, Charity, Haddadi, Azita, Doucette, J Ronald, Nazarali, Adil J

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease with unpredictable phases of relapse and remission. The cause of MS is unknown, but the pathology is characterized by infiltration of auto-reactive immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in widespread neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Immunomodulatory-based therapies emerged in the 1990s and have been a cornerstone of disease management ever since. Interferon β (IFNβ) was the first biologic approved after demonstrating decreased relapse rates, disease activity and progression of disability in clinical trials. However, frequent dosing schedules have limited patient acceptance for long-term therapy. Pegylation, the process by which molecules of polyethylene glycol are covalently linked to a compound, has been utilized to increase the half-life of IFNβ and decrease the frequency of administration required. To date, there has been one clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of pegylated IFN. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of IFN in the treatment of MS and evaluate the available evidence for pegylated IFN therapy in MS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Other 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Unspecified 1 5%
Professor 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 7 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 2 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Social Sciences 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 10 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2017.
All research outputs
#12,312,547
of 15,498,340 outputs
Outputs from Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease
#48
of 65 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,065
of 265,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Degenerative Neurological and Neuromuscular Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,498,340 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 65 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them