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Why do seniors leave resistance training programs?

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
Title
Why do seniors leave resistance training programs?
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s128324
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elissa Burton, Anne-Marie Hill, Simone Pettigrew, Gill Lewin, Liz Bainbridge, Kaela Farrier, Phil Airey, Keith D Hill

Abstract

The proportion of the population, that is older, is growing at a faster rate than other age groups. Physical activity is important for older people because it assists in living independently. Participating in resistance training on a regular basis (twice weekly) is recommended for older people; yet, fewer than 15% of people over 60 years achieve this level. The aim of this article was to investigate the factors contributing to older people's decisions to stop participation in a resistance training program. Participants were older people who had chosen to participate in a structured resistance training program specifically designed for seniors and then after a period of time discontinued. This population received a questionnaire in the mail focused on factors contributing to their cessation of resistance training exercise. Qualitative results were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Fifty-six survey responses were received (average age 71.5 years, SD =9.0; 79% females). Injury, illness, and holidaying were the main reasons for ceasing participation. A small but important number of responses (11%) reported that they considered they were not provided with sufficient support during the resistance training programs. To attract and retain their senior clients, the results indicate that program organizers need to provide tailored support to return to resistance training after injury and offer flexible and individualized services that accommodate older people's life choices in retirement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 8 11%
Professor 4 5%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 15 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 15%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 25 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,016,614
of 16,585,337 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#271
of 1,563 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,330
of 268,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#7
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,585,337 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,563 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.