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Early discharge compared with ordinary discharge after percutaneous coronary intervention – a systematic review and meta-analysis of safety and cost

Overview of attention for article published in Vascular Health and Risk Management, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
Early discharge compared with ordinary discharge after percutaneous coronary intervention – a systematic review and meta-analysis of safety and cost
Published in
Vascular Health and Risk Management, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/vhrm.s122951
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Abdelnoor, Jack Gunnar Andersen, Harald Arnesen, Odd Johansen

Abstract

We aimed to summarize the pooled effect of early discharge compared with ordinary discharge after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the composite endpoint of re-infarction, revascularization, stroke, death, and incidence of rehospitalization. We also aimed to compare costs for the two strategies. The study was a systematic review and a meta-analysis of 12 randomized controlled trials including 2962 patients, followed by trial sequential analysis. An estimation of cost was considered. Follow-up time was 30 days. For early discharge, pooled effect for the composite endpoint was relative risk of efficacy (RRe)=0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.52-0.81). Rehospitalization had a pooled effect of RRe=1.10, 95% CI (0.88-1.38). Early discharge had an increasing risk of rehospitalization with increasing frequency of hypertension for all populations, except those with stable angina, where a decreasing risk was noted. Advancing age gave increased risk of revascularization. Early discharge had a cost reduction of 655 Euros per patient compared with ordinary discharge. The pooled effect supports the safe use of early discharge after PCI in the treatment of a heterogeneous population of patients with coronary artery disease. There was an increased risk of rehospitalization for all subpopulations, except patients with stable angina. Clinical trials with homogeneous populations of acute coronary syndrome are needed to be conclusive on this issue.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 11%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 30 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Psychology 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 37 52%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2018.
All research outputs
#8,796,380
of 14,574,779 outputs
Outputs from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#347
of 587 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,674
of 264,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#5
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,574,779 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 587 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,352 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.