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The US Food and Drug Administration's drug safety recommendations and long-acting beta2-agonist dispensing pattern changes in adult asthma patients..

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Asthma and Allergy, March 2017
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Title
The US Food and Drug Administration's drug safety recommendations and long-acting beta2-agonist dispensing pattern changes in adult asthma patients..
Published in
Journal of Asthma and Allergy, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/jaa.s124395
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhou, Esther H, Seymour, Sally, Goulding, Margie R, Kang, Elizabeth M, Major, Jacqueline M, Iyasu, Solomon

Abstract

Emerging safety issues associated with long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) have led to multiple regulatory activities by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 2003, including Drug Safety Communications (DSCs) in 2010. These DSCs had three specific recommendations for the safe use of LABA products in adult asthma treatment. We examined the initiation of LABA-containing products for adult asthma treatment using an intermittent time series approach in a claims database from 2003 to 2012. We assessed the alignment of dispensing patterns with the following 2010 FDA recommendations: 1) contraindicated use of single-ingredient (SI)-LABA without an asthma controller medication (ACM); 2) a LABA should only be used when asthma is not adequately controlled on inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) or ACM; and 3) step-down asthma therapy (e.g., discontinue LABA) when asthma control is achieved. There were 477,922 adults (18-64 years old) dispensed a new LABA during 2003-2012. Among LABA initiators, patients who initiated an SI-LABA and who did "not" have an ACM dispensed on the same date decreased from >9% in 2003 (the initial labeling change) to <2% post 2010 DSCs (p-value <0.0001 in the segmented regression model). The proportion of asthma patients dispensed an ICS in 6 months prior to initiating LABA treatment did not increase. The proportion of patients with longer than 4 months of continuous treatment did not decrease over the study period. Although the decrease in SI-LABA initiation is consistent with FDA's recommendations, low ICS dispensing before initiating a LABA and LABA continuation practices require further efforts to move toward the recommended safe practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 50%
Student > Bachelor 1 25%
Unknown 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 25%
Unknown 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,065,338
of 9,272,034 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Asthma and Allergy
#101
of 118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,465
of 260,732 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Asthma and Allergy
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,272,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 118 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,732 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.