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Compulsive exercise: links, risks and challenges faced

Overview of attention for article published in Psychology Research and Behavior Management, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
92 Mendeley
Title
Compulsive exercise: links, risks and challenges faced
Published in
Psychology Research and Behavior Management, March 2017
DOI 10.2147/prbm.s113093
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mia Beck Lichtenstein, Cecilie Juul Hinze, Bolette Emborg, Freja Thomsen, Simone Daugaard Hemmingsen

Abstract

Compulsive exercise is a condition described since 1970s. It is characterized by a craving for physical training, resulting in uncontrollable excessive exercise behavior with harmful consequences, such as injuries and impaired social relations. It has not been accepted as a mental disorder in either International Classification of Diseases or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The aim of this literature review was to critically examine the research on links (comorbidity), risks (negative consequences), and challenges faced (problems in a treatment context). This review found that compulsive exercise is associated with eating disorder pathology, perfectionism, neuroticism, narcissism, and obsessive compulsive traits. The most prominent negative consequences were injuries, social impairment, and depression, but more research is needed to uncover the potential dysfunction resulting from compulsive exercise. As the condition is not recognized as a psychiatric disorder, studies on treatment interventions are sparse. Problems with compliance have been reported; therefore, motivational interviewing has been proposed as a treatment approach, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy. This review summarizes and discusses findings on links/comorbidity, risks/negative consequences, and treatment challenges. We suggest that future studies should pay attention to both prevention and counseling in sports settings, where compulsive exercise appears, as the condition may be associated with harmful consequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 92 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 23%
Student > Master 20 22%
Unspecified 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 16%
Researcher 6 7%
Other 15 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 26%
Unspecified 19 21%
Sports and Recreations 14 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Other 20 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,687,589
of 12,022,940 outputs
Outputs from Psychology Research and Behavior Management
#53
of 198 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,218
of 267,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychology Research and Behavior Management
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,022,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 198 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.