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Pathogenic beliefs among patients with depressive disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Pathogenic beliefs among patients with depressive disorders
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s136212
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam Neelapaijit, Tinakon Wongpakaran, Nahathai Wongpakaran, Kulvadee Thongpibul

Abstract

Pathogenic belief is a central construct within control-mastery theory, which is an integrated dynamic-cognitive-relational approach in psychotherapy. Pathogenic beliefs result from traumatic life experiences and are considered the root of any psychological disorders presented clinically. Nevertheless, how and what type of pathogenic beliefs are attributed to clinical depressive disorder is unknown. The present study aimed to examine this issue. Thirty patients with depressive disorder, who came for psychotherapy at a psychotherapy clinic, were matched based on age and gender with healthy controls who were medical students. The 54-item pathogenic belief scale (PBS) was administered and compared between depressive and control groups using odds ratio (OR). The depressed group's PBS mean score was significantly higher than the healthy controls (t=3.78, P<0.001). Thirteen of 54 items significantly differed between the two groups with ORs ranging from 3.76 to 16.79. The content of pathogenic beliefs centered on the issues of negative sense of self, lack of self-efficacy and control, and relational difficulties related to feelings of fear and humiliation. Influences of culture and gender differences on pathogenic beliefs were discussed. Pathogenic beliefs relate to depression such that the higher the number of pathogenic beliefs one has, the more the likelihood of having depression. Since the PBS was developed based on clinical data (rather than theory based), cultural issues as well as age and gender may influence the development of pathogenic beliefs. Further study should be warranted and implications for clinical practice are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Singapore 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Computer Science 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 April 2017.
All research outputs
#9,127,232
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,563
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,657
of 265,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#48
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,232 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.