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Hashimoto encephalopathy with high plasma monoamine metabolite levels: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2017
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Title
Hashimoto encephalopathy with high plasma monoamine metabolite levels: a case report
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s131356
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sho Horikoshi, Itaru Miura, Yasuto Kunii, Satoko Asano, Keiko Kanno-Nozaki, Hirobumi Mashiko, Hirooki Yabe

Abstract

Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is believed to be an immune-mediated disorder associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It was suggested that neuropsychiatric symptoms, the presence of antithyroid antibody, and good response to steroids were important for the diagnosis of HE. It has been reported that homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), which are monoamine metabolites of dopamine and noradrenaline, respectively, are the possible biomarkers of neuropsychiatric diseases. We report a case of Hashimoto encephalopathy, in which we longitudinally measured the plasma levels of monoamine metabolites. A 52-year-old woman developed acute psychosis, and was admitted to the psychiatric ward of our hospital due to psychotic state, 6 days after a traffic accident. An extensive evaluation showed no remarkable findings, except an increase in antithyroglobulin antibodies. Plasma levels of HVA and MHPG were extremely high at 66.5 and 41.8 ng/mL, respectively. On day 16, 50 mg/day oral prednisolone was administered, which improved her psychotic symptoms. Plasma levels of HVA and MHPG decreased to 7.2 and 9.9 ng/mL, respectively, on day 19. After the temporary worsening of psychosis and increase in plasma levels of HVA and MHPG, the dosage of prednisolone was tapered and low-dose risperidone was started. Her psychiatric symptoms gradually improved and plasma monoamine metabolite levels decreased again (HVA: 17.9 ng/mL; MHPG: 7.7 ng/mL). Although autoimmune mechanism has been suggested to be involved in HE, neural mechanism and pathogenesis of HE remain unknown. Our findings suggest that monoaminergic neural activity might be associated with psychotic symptoms in patients with HE and plasma levels of monoamine metabolites might be useful as state markers.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 15%
Unspecified 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 4 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 15%
Neuroscience 3 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2017.
All research outputs
#12,842,641
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,002
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#227,170
of 265,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#68
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.