↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Reduced nuclear translocation of serum response factor is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy in a cigarette smoke-induced mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, February 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
Title
Reduced nuclear translocation of serum response factor is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy in a cigarette smoke-induced mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, February 2017
DOI 10.2147/copd.s109243
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ran Ma, Xuefang Gong, Hua Jiang, Chunyi Lin, Yuqin Chen, Xiaoming Xu, Chenting Zhang, Jian Wang, Wenju Lu, Nanshan Zhong

Abstract

Skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction are common complications in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor which is critical in myocyte differentiation and growth. In this study, we established a mouse COPD model induced by cigarette smoking (CS) exposure for 24 weeks, with apparent pathophysiological changes, including increased airway resistance, enlarged alveoli, and skeletal muscle atrophy. Levels of upstream regulators of SRF, striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) were decreased in quadriceps muscle of COPD mice. Meanwhile, the nucleic location of SRF was diminished along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. There was a downregulation of the target muscle-specific gene, Igf1. These results suggest that the CS is one of the major causes for COPD pathogenesis, which induces the COPD-associated skeletal muscle atrophy which is closely related to decreasing SRF nucleic translocation, consequently downregulating the SRF target genes involved in muscle growth and nutrition. The STARS/RhoA signaling pathway might contribute to this course by impacting SRF subcellular distribution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Computer Science 1 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 6 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,487,329
of 9,700,021 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#959
of 1,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,982
of 262,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#54
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,700,021 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,234 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,019 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.