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A qualitative study examining health literacy and chronic illness self-management in Hispanic and non-Hispanic older adults

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
Title
A qualitative study examining health literacy and chronic illness self-management in Hispanic and non-Hispanic older adults
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, April 2017
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s135370
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin J Jacobs, Raymond L Ownby, Amarilis Acevedo, Drenna Waldrop-Valverde, Robin Jacobs

Abstract

Chronic illness and low levels of health literacy affect health outcomes for many individuals, particularly older adults and racial/ethnic minorities. This study sought to understand the knowledge, strengths, and areas of need regarding self-management of chronic illness in order to lay the groundwork for content development of an intervention to increase health literacy and maximize patient engagement in chronic disease self-care. In-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted in Spanish and English with 25 older adults with various chronic illnesses. Topics included knowledge and understanding of chronic conditions, medications, and disease self-management skills. Qualitative data were coded by searching text and conducting cross-case analysis. An inductive analysis was then employed to allow for the patterns and themes to emerge. Emerged themes included 1) social support, 2) coping strategies, 3) spirituality, 4) chronic disease health literacy, 5) anger, and 6) depression. While participants had a general overall knowledge of chronic illness, they had deficits in knowledge regarding their own illnesses and medications. Chronic illness self-management is a complex and dynamic behavioral process. This study identified themes that leverage patient motivation to engage in self-care in a personalized manner. This information will guide the development of an intervention to promote health literacy and optimal disease self-management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Other 7 8%
Librarian 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 20 24%
Unknown 16 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 22 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 20%
Social Sciences 12 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Sports and Recreations 3 4%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 16 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2017.
All research outputs
#4,445,298
of 9,768,421 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#100
of 257 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,246
of 261,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,768,421 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 257 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.