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Metabolic screening and its impact in children with non-syndromic intellectual disability

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2017
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38 Mendeley
Title
Metabolic screening and its impact in children with non-syndromic intellectual disability
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, April 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s130196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yasser F Ali, Salah EL-Morshedy, Riad M Elsayed, Amr M El-Sherbini, Saber AM El-Sayed, Nasser Ismail A Abdelrahman, Abdulbasit Abdulhalim Imam

Abstract

The objective of this study was to analyze the value of routine metabolic screening tests in children with an intellectual disability (ID) and its impact on improving their outcome and quality of life through appropriate intervention and treatment. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Pediatric Neurology Clinic, Al Khafji Joint Operations Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 150 children with nonsyndromic ID (66% males) in the age range of 5-17 years were compared with 50 apparently healthy age- and sex-matched controls. All studied groups were subjected to detailed history taking, family pedigree, thorough clinical examination, anthropometric measurements, routine laboratory investigations and urine metabolic screening tests (ferric chloride test and toluidine blue spot test and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). Electroencephalography, IQ, psychiatric assessment and chromosomal study were done for the patient group only. Positive consanguineous marriage, older maternal or paternal age and family history of mental disabilities in other siblings were considered as risk factors for the development of mental disabilities. History of admission to neonatal intensive care unit was significantly higher among the patient group than among the controls (P<0.05). Metabolic screening tests showed that up to 35% of patients were positive for ferric chloride test, 9% of patients were positive for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and only 7 out of 150 (4.7%) patients were toluidine blue test positive. Metabolic testing should be considered in the workup of individuals with nonsyndromic ID, which will need further specific investigations to confirm the diagnosis and determine the possible treatable cases.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 13%
Psychology 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 11 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2017.
All research outputs
#12,842,681
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#2,006
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,645
of 265,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#63
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,264 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.