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Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and herbal medicines: a review

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Nanomedicine, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
194 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
406 Mendeley
Title
Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and herbal medicines: a review
Published in
International Journal of Nanomedicine, December 2013
DOI 10.2147/ijn.s52634
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrícia Silva, Bruna Bonifácio, Matheus Ramos, Kamila Negri, Tais Maria Bauab, Marlus Chorilli

Abstract

Herbal medicines have been widely used around the world since ancient times. The advancement of phytochemical and phytopharmacological sciences has enabled elucidation of the composition and biological activities of several medicinal plant products. The effectiveness of many species of medicinal plants depends on the supply of active compounds. Most of the biologically active constituents of extracts, such as flavonoids, tannins, and terpenoids, are highly soluble in water, but have low absorption, because they are unable to cross the lipid membranes of the cells, have excessively high molecular size, or are poorly absorbed, resulting in loss of bioavailability and efficacy. Some extracts are not used clinically because of these obstacles. It has been widely proposed to combine herbal medicine with nanotechnology, because nanostructured systems might be able to potentiate the action of plant extracts, reducing the required dose and side effects, and improving activity. Nanosystems can deliver the active constituent at a sufficient concentration during the entire treatment period, directing it to the desired site of action. Conventional treatments do not meet these requirements. The purpose of this study is to review nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems and herbal medicines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 406 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Algeria 1 <1%
Unknown 400 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 79 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 67 17%
Student > Bachelor 54 13%
Researcher 39 10%
Student > Postgraduate 27 7%
Other 72 18%
Unknown 68 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 90 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 14%
Chemistry 39 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 37 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 36 9%
Other 51 13%
Unknown 95 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2015.
All research outputs
#7,675,477
of 12,733,124 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#1,103
of 2,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,724
of 246,021 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Nanomedicine
#43
of 123 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,733,124 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,493 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,021 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 123 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.