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Effect of vitamin K supplementation on insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, May 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Effect of vitamin K supplementation on insulin sensitivity: a meta-analysis
Published in
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, May 2017
DOI 10.2147/dmso.s137571
Pubmed ID
Authors

Naeti Suksomboon, Nalinee Poolsup, Htoo Darli Ko Ko

Abstract

To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials to assess the effect of vitamin K supplementation on insulin sensitivity. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, clinicaltrials.gov, and clinicaltrialresults.org were searched up to January 2017. Reference lists of related papers were also scanned. Randomized controlled trials were selected if they compared vitamin K supplementation with placebo or no treatment and reported homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, leptin, or interleukin-6 levels. Data extraction and study quality assessment were performed independently by two investigators using a standardized data extraction form. Any inconsistencies were resolved by a third reviewer. Effect estimates were pooled using inverse-variance weighted method. Heterogeneity was assessed by the I(2) and Q statistic. A total of eight trials involving 1,077 participants met the inclusion criteria. A wide variety of participants were enrolled, including older men, postmenopausal women, prediabetic premenopausal women, and participants with a history of diabetes, hypertension, or vascular disease. Vitamin K1 and vitamin K2 (MK-4 and MK-7 subtypes) were assessed. Supplementation period ranged from 4 weeks to 3 years. Vitamin K supplementation did not affect insulin sensitivity as measured by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, leptin, and interleukin-6 levels. Our analysis suggests no effect of vitamin K supplementation on insulin sensitivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 5 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Chemistry 1 7%
Mathematics 1 7%
Unknown 7 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2017.
All research outputs
#5,691,564
of 9,957,452 outputs
Outputs from Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
#146
of 236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,896
of 262,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,957,452 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 236 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,982 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.