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Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine

Overview of attention for article published in Vascular Health and Risk Management, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
Advances in the management of heart failure: the role of ivabradine
Published in
Vascular Health and Risk Management, November 2016
DOI 10.2147/vhrm.s90383
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ursula Müller-Werdan, Georg Stöckl, Karl Werdan

Abstract

A high resting heart rate (≥70-75 b.p.m.) is a risk factor for patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (EF), probably in the sense of accelerated atherosclerosis, with an increased morbidity and mortality. Beta-blockers not only reduce heart rate but also have negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effects, and therefore, in many patients, they cannot be given in the recommended dose. Ivabradine specifically inhibits the pacemaker current (funny current, If) of the sinoatrial node cells, resulting in therapeutic heart rate lowering without any negative inotropic and blood pressure-lowering effect. According to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines, ivabradine should be considered to reduce the risk of HF hospitalization and cardiovascular death in symptomatic patients with a reduced left ventricular EF ≤35% and sinus rhythm ≥70 b.p.m. despite treatment with an evidence-based dose of beta-blocker or a dose below the recommended dose (recommendation class "IIa" = weight of evidence/opinion is in favor of usefulness/efficacy: "should be considered"; level of evidence "B" = data derived from a single randomized clinical trial or large nonrandomized studies). Using a heart rate cutoff of ≥ 75 b.p.m., as licensed by the European Medicines Agency, treatment with ivabradine 5-7.5 mg b.i.d. reduces cardiovascular mortality by 17%, HF mortality by 39% and HF hospitalization rate by 30%. A high resting heart rate is not only a risk factor in HF with reduced EF but also at least a risk marker in HF with preserved EF, in acute HF and also in special forms of HF. In this review, we discuss the proven role of ivabradine in the validated indication "HF with reduced EF" together with interesting preliminary findings, and the potential role of ivabradine in further, specific forms of HF.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 14 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 30%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 16%
Unspecified 6 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,485,924
of 9,782,970 outputs
Outputs from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#60
of 457 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,516
of 264,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vascular Health and Risk Management
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,782,970 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 457 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.