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Giant thrombosed intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm presenting as Tolosa–Hunt syndrome in a patient harboring a new pathogenic neurofibromatosis type 1 mutation: a case report and review of the…

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, January 2014
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Title
Giant thrombosed intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm presenting as Tolosa–Hunt syndrome in a patient harboring a new pathogenic neurofibromatosis type 1 mutation: a case report and review of the literature
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, January 2014
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s49784
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariarosa AB Melone, Renata Conforti, Mario Cirillo, Valeria Marrone, Galasso, Capaldo, Giugliano, Assunta Scuotto, Giulio Piluso

Abstract

Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a relatively common single-gene disorder, and is caused by heterozygous mutations in the NF1 gene that result in a loss of activity or in a nonfunctional neurofibromin protein. Despite the common association of NF1 with neurocutaneous features, its pathology can extend to numerous tissues not derived from the neural crest. Among the rare cerebrovascular abnormalities in NF1, more than 85% of cases are of purely occlusive or stenotic nature, with intracranial aneurysm being uncommon. Predominantly, the aneurysms are located in the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), being very rare bilateral aneurysms. This report describes a very unusual case of fusiform aneurysms of both ICAs in a Caucasian NF1 patient, with a new pathogenic intragenic heterozygous deletion of the NF1 gene, presenting at age 22 years with Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, because of partial thrombosis of the left giant intracavernous aneurysm. Medical treatment with anticoagulant therapy allowed a good outcome for the patient. In conclusion, early identification of cerebral arteriopathy in NF1 and close follow-up of its progression by neuroimaging may lead to early medical or surgical intervention and prevention of significant neurologic complications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 20%
Researcher 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Neuroscience 2 13%
Psychology 1 7%
Chemistry 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2014.
All research outputs
#11,519,317
of 14,535,828 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,800
of 2,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,080
of 248,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#77
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,535,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,442 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.