↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

Exercise physiologists: essential players in interdisciplinary teams for noncommunicable chronic disease management

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 484)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
71 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
Title
Exercise physiologists: essential players in interdisciplinary teams for noncommunicable chronic disease management
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, January 2014
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s55620
Pubmed ID
Authors

Esme Soan, Steven Street, Sharon Brownie, Andrew Hills

Abstract

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, are a growing public health challenge in Australia, accounting for a significant and increasing cost to the health care system. Management of these chronic conditions is aided by interprofessional practice, but models of care require updating to incorporate the latest evidence-based practice. Increasing research evidence reports the benefits of physical activity and exercise on health status and the risk of inactivity to chronic disease development, yet physical activity advice is often the least comprehensive component of care. An essential but as yet underutilized player in NCD prevention and management is the "accredited exercise physiologist," a specialist in the delivery of clinical exercise prescriptions for the prevention or management of chronic and complex conditions. In this article, the existing role of accredited exercise physiologists in interprofessional practice is examined, and an extension of their role proposed in primary health care settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 71 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 73 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 19%
Student > Master 14 19%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Other 5 7%
Other 18 24%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 26%
Sports and Recreations 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2020.
All research outputs
#474,000
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#9
of 484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,778
of 263,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 484 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,747 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.