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Social participation and perceived depression among elderly population in South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, June 2017
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
Title
Social participation and perceived depression among elderly population in South Africa
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, June 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s137993
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gang Hao, Ghose Bishwajit, Shangfeng Tang, Changping Nie, Lu Ji, Rui Huang

Abstract

There is a growing consensus regarding the influence of various psychosocial factors such as degree of social participation on health and disease outcomes, quality of life, and general well-being. Older individuals with diminished motor and physical functionality suffer a heightened risk of social exclusion and loneliness. Previous studies have demonstrated the association between social exclusion and loneliness with mental health among the older population. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether or not difficulty in social participation has any relationship with perceived depression among older individuals in South Africa. We collected cross-sectional data from the SAGE Well-Being of Older People Study 2010 on 422 men and women aged 50 years and above. Perceived depression and loss of interest in things (eg, personal relationships, hobbies) during the last 12 months were used as outcome variables with difficulty in joining community activities, relationships/community participation, friendships, and visiting family/friends as the main explanatory variables. Findings indicated that the prevalence of self-reported depression and the feeling of reduced interest in most things were respectively 51.9% and 43.8%. In the multivariate analysis, those who reported difficulty in joining community activities had respectively 64% (OR =1.639; 95% CI =1.081-2.583) and 69% (OR =1.685; 95% CI) higher odds of depression and loss of interest in things compared with those who did not report any difficulty. The study concludes that addressing the barriers to engaging in community activities may help minimize burden of depression among the elderly population in South Africa. Furthermore, large-scale studies are warranted to explore the social and structural barriers which constrain community participation among the elderly population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Student > Bachelor 14 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 17 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 19%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Psychology 3 4%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 26 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2017.
All research outputs
#8,841,096
of 14,612,391 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#850
of 1,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,110
of 265,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#27
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,612,391 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,462 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,942 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.