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The potential role of vagus-nerve stimulation in the treatment of HIV-associated depression: a review of literature

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
Title
The potential role of vagus-nerve stimulation in the treatment of HIV-associated depression: a review of literature
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2017
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s136065
Pubmed ID
Authors

William C Nicholson, Mirjam-Colette Kempf, Linda Moneyham, David E Vance

Abstract

Depression is the most common comorbidity and neuropsychiatric complication in HIV. Estimates suggest that the prevalence rate for depression among HIV-infected individuals is three times that of the general population. The association between HIV and clinical depression is complex; however, chronic activation of inflammatory mechanisms, which disrupt central nervous system (CNS) function, may contribute to this association. Disruptions in CNS function can result in cognitive disorders, social withdrawal, fatigue, apathy, psychomotor impairment, and sleep disturbances, which are common manifestations in depression and HIV alike. Interestingly, the parasympathetic system-associated vagus nerve (VN) has primary homeostatic properties that restore CNS function following a stress or inflammatory response. Unfortunately, about 30% of adults with HIV are resistant to standard psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological treatments for depression, thus suggesting the need for alternative treatment approaches. VN stimulation (VNS) and its benefits as a treatment for depression have been well documented, but remain unexplored in the HIV population. Historically, VNS has been delivered using a surgically implanted device; however, transcutanous VNS (tVNS) with nonsurgical auricular technology is now available. Although it currently lacks Food and Drug Administration approval in the US, evidence suggests several advantages of tVNS, including a reduced side-effect profile when compared to standard treatments and comparable results to implantable VNS in treating depression. Therefore, tVNS could offer an alternative for managing depression in HIV via regulating CNS function; moreover, tVNS may be useful for treatment of other symptoms common in HIV. From this, implications for nursing research and practice are provided.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Student > Master 8 10%
Researcher 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 26 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Psychology 10 13%
Neuroscience 7 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 30 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2017.
All research outputs
#7,791,239
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#1,017
of 2,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,208
of 266,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#30
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,388 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.