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Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education

Overview of attention for article published in Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, October 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 540)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
219 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
539 Mendeley
Title
Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education
Published in
Risk Management and Healthcare Policy, October 2010
DOI 10.2147/rmhp.s7500
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Adams

Abstract

A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been promoted as one such potential approach.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 539 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 1%
Portugal 4 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 519 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 112 21%
Student > Bachelor 74 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 12%
Researcher 48 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 46 9%
Other 104 19%
Unknown 93 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 158 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 93 17%
Social Sciences 35 6%
Psychology 18 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 17 3%
Other 108 20%
Unknown 110 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2019.
All research outputs
#946,298
of 21,353,399 outputs
Outputs from Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
#17
of 540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,280
of 204,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,353,399 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,648 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them