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Impact of T1 slope on surgical and adjacent segment degeneration after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, August 2017
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Title
Impact of T1 slope on surgical and adjacent segment degeneration after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, August 2017
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s138990
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peng Yang, Yongqian Li, Jia Li, Yong Shen

Abstract

This retrospective study investigated an association between preoperative T1 slope and surgical and adjacent segment degeneration (SASD) after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty (BCDA) in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease. Based on preoperative standing lateral radiographs, 90 patients were classified according to T1 slope that was higher or lower than the 50th percentile (high T1 or low T1, 28 and 62 patients, respectively). Patients were also classified as SASD or non-SASD (38 and 52 patients, respectively) determined by radiographs at final follow-up. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores for neck and arm pain were noted, and changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and FSU range of motion (ROM) were also noted. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for SASD. The overall rate of SASD was 42.2% (38/90). The SACS, FSU angle, FSU ROM, and SASD rates of the high T1 and low T1 slope groups were significantly different at the last follow-up. The NDI and VAS scores of the high T1 slope group were significantly greater than those of the low T1 slope. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that high T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy (ie, residual space behind the prosthesis) were significant risk factors for SASD after BCDA. High T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy were associated with SASD after BCDA. Patients with a high preoperative T1 slope have a smaller FSU angle and more neck pain after BCDA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Researcher 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Computer Science 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,993,265
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#769
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,898
of 263,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#17
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.