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Therapeutic implications of Epstein–Barr virus infection for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, September 2014
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
Title
Therapeutic implications of Epstein–Barr virus infection for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma
Published in
Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, September 2014
DOI 10.2147/tcrm.s47434
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanna Hilda Hutajulu, Johan Kurnianda, Bing I Tan, Jaap M Middeldorp

Abstract

Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is highly endemic in certain regions including the People's Republic of China and Southeast Asia. Its etiology is unique and multifactorial, involving genetic background, epigenetic, and environment factors, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The presence of EBV in all tumor cells, aberrant pattern of antibodies against EBV antigens in patient sera, and elevated viral DNA in patient circulation as well as nasopharyngeal site underline the role of EBV during NPC development. In NPC tumors, EBV expresses latency type II, where three EBV-encoded proteins, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1, latent membrane protein 1 and 2 (LMP1, 2), are expressed along with BamH1-A rightward reading frame 1, Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small nuclear RNAs, and BamH1-A rightward transcripts. Among all encoded proteins, LMP1 plays a central role in the propagation of NPC. Standard treatment of NPC consists of radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for early stage, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced tumors, and palliative systemic chemotherapy in metastatic disease. However, this standard care has limitations, allowing recurrences and disease progression in a certain proportion of cases. Although the pathophysiological link and molecular process of EBV-induced oncogenesis are not fully understood, therapeutic approaches targeting the virus may increase the cure rate and add clinical benefit. The promising results of early phase clinical trials on EBV-specific immunotherapy, epigenetic therapy, and treatment with viral lytic induction offer new options for treating NPC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2014.
All research outputs
#11,102,649
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#851
of 922 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,505
of 208,034 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,485,238 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 922 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,034 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.