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Applying theory of planned behavior to predict exercise maintenance in sarcopenic elderly.

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2014
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1 tweeter

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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200 Mendeley
Title
Applying theory of planned behavior to predict exercise maintenance in sarcopenic elderly.
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, January 2014
DOI 10.2147/cia.s60462
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohamad Hasnan Ahmad, Suzana Shahar, Nur Islami Mohd Fahmi Teng, Zahara Abdul Manaf, Noor Ibrahim Mohd Sakian, Baharudin Omar

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the factors associated with exercise behavior based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) among the sarcopenic elderly people in Cheras, Kuala Lumpur. A total of 65 subjects with mean ages of 67.5±5.2 (men) and 66.1±5.1 (women) years participated in this study. Subjects were divided into two groups: 1) exercise group (n=34; 25 men, nine women); and 2) the control group (n=31; 22 men, nine women). Structural equation modeling, based on TPB components, was applied to determine specific factors that most contribute to and predict actual behavior toward exercise. Based on the TPB's model, attitude (β=0.60) and perceived behavioral control (β=0.24) were the major predictors of intention to exercise among men at the baseline. Among women, the subjective norm (β=0.82) was the major predictor of intention to perform the exercise at the baseline. After 12 weeks, attitude (men's, β=0.68; women's, β=0.24) and subjective norm (men's, β=0.12; women's, β=0.87) were the predictors of the intention to perform the exercise. "Feels healthier with exercise" was the specific factor to improve the intention to perform and to maintain exercise behavior in men (β=0.36) and women (β=0.49). "Not motivated to perform exercise" was the main barrier among men's intention to exercise. The intention to perform the exercise was able to predict actual behavior regarding exercise at the baseline and at 12 weeks of an intervention program. As a conclusion, TPB is a useful model to determine and to predict maintenance of exercise in the sarcopenic elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 198 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 55 28%
Student > Bachelor 35 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Researcher 9 5%
Other 25 13%
Unknown 41 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 40 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 26 13%
Social Sciences 18 9%
Psychology 16 8%
Sports and Recreations 16 8%
Other 38 19%
Unknown 46 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2014.
All research outputs
#3,052,277
of 4,507,652 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#467
of 642 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,678
of 120,023 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#13
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,652 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 642 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,023 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.