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Modulation of the GABAergic pathway for the treatment of fragile X syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
patent
8 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
138 Mendeley
Title
Modulation of the GABAergic pathway for the treatment of fragile X syndrome
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, September 2014
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s42919
Pubmed ID
Authors

Randi Hagerman, Reymundo Lozano, Emma Hare

Abstract

Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the most common single-gene cause of autism. It is caused by mutations on the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1) and lack of fragile X mental retardation protein, which in turn, leads to decreased inhibition of translation of many synaptic proteins. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hypothesis states that the neurological deficits in individuals with FXS are due mainly to downstream consequences of overstimulation of the mGluR pathway. The main efforts have focused on mGluR5 targeted treatments; however, investigation on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system and its potential as a targeted treatment is less emphasized. The fragile X mouse models (Fmr1-knock out) show decreased GABA subunit receptors, decreased synthesis of GABA, increased catabolism of GABA, and overall decreased GABAergic input in many regions of the brain. Consequences of the reduced GABAergic input in FXS include oversensitivity to sensory stimuli, seizures, and anxiety. Deficits in the GABA receptors in different regions of the brain are associated with behavioral and attentional processing deficits linked to anxiety and autistic behaviors. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to the development of targeted treatments for the core behavioral features of FXS, which include social deficits, inattention, and anxiety. These symptoms are also observed in individuals with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, therefore the targeted treatments for FXS are leading the way in the treatment of other neurodevelopmental syndromes and autism. The GABAergic system in FXS represents a target for new treatments. Herein, we discuss the animal and human trials of GABAergic treatment in FXS. Arbaclofen and ganaxolone have been used in individuals with FXS. Other potential GABAergic treatments, such as riluzole, gaboxadol, tiagabine, and vigabatrin, will be also discussed. Further studies are needed to determine the safety and efficacy of GABAergic treatments for FXS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Unknown 135 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 17%
Student > Master 21 15%
Student > Bachelor 20 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 11 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 31 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 18%
Psychology 12 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 7%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 14 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2021.
All research outputs
#1,737,233
of 19,200,799 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#226
of 2,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,918
of 220,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#6
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,200,799 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,769 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.