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General anesthetic and the risk of dementia in elderly patients: current insights

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
Title
General anesthetic and the risk of dementia in elderly patients: current insights
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, September 2014
DOI 10.2147/cia.s49680
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Hussain, Miles Berger, Roderic G Eckenhoff, Dallas P Seitz, Hussain M, Berger M, Eckenhoff RG, Seitz DP, Dallas Seitz, Roderic Eckenhoff

Abstract

In this review, we aim to provide clinical insights into the relationship between surgery, general anesthesia (GA), and dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathogenesis of AD is complex, involving specific disease-linked proteins (amyloid-beta [Aβ] and tau), inflammation, and neurotransmitter dysregulation. Many points in this complex pathogenesis can potentially be influenced by both surgery and anesthetics. It has been demonstrated in some in vitro, animal, and human studies that some anesthetics are associated with increased aggregation and oligomerization of Aβ peptide and enhanced accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Two neurocognitive syndromes that have been studied in relation to surgery and anesthesia are postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, both of which occur more commonly in older adults after surgery and anesthesia. Neither the route of anesthesia nor the type of anesthetic appears to be significantly associated with the development of postoperative delirium or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. A meta-analysis of case-control studies found no association between prior exposure to surgery utilizing GA and incident AD (pooled odds ratio =1.05, P=0.43). The few cohort studies on this topic have shown varying associations between surgery, GA, and AD, with one showing an increased risk, and another demonstrating a decreased risk. A recent randomized trial has shown that patients who received sevoflurane during spinal surgery were more likely to have progression of preexisting mild cognitive impairment compared to controls and to patients who received propofol or epidural anesthesia. Given the inconsistent evidence on the association between surgery, anesthetic type, and AD, well-designed and adequately powered studies with longer follow-up periods are required to establish a clear causal association between surgery, GA, and AD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 100 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 18%
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Postgraduate 13 12%
Other 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 26 25%
Unknown 12 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 52 50%
Psychology 10 10%
Neuroscience 8 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,914,714
of 11,918,812 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#250
of 1,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,229
of 212,853 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#7
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,918,812 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,212 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,853 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.