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Clostridium difficile infection in the elderly: an update on management

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
139 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
<em>Clostridium difficile</em> infection in the elderly: an update on management
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, October 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s149089
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tomefa Asempa, David Nicolau

Abstract

The burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is profound and growing. CDI now represents a common cause of health care-associated diarrhea, and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. CDI disproportionally affects the elderly, possibly explained by the following risk factors: age-related impairment of the immune system, increasing antibiotic utilization, and frequent health care exposure. In the USA, recent epidemiological studies estimate that two out of every three health care-associated CDIs occur in patients 65 years or older. Additionally, the elderly are at higher risk for recurrent CDI. Existing therapeutic options include metronidazole, oral vancomycin, and fidaxomicin. Choice of agent depends on disease severity, history of recurrence, and, increasingly, the drug cost. Bezlotoxumab, a recently approved monoclonal antibody targeting C. difficile toxin B, offers an exciting advancement into immunologic therapies. Similarly, fecal microbiota transplantation is gaining popularity as an effective option mainly for recurrent CDI. The challenge of decreasing CDI burden in the elderly involves adopting preventative strategies, optimizing initial treatment, and decreasing the risk of recurrence. Expanded strategies are certainly needed to improve outcomes in this high-risk population. This review considers available data from prospective and retrospective studies as well as case reports to illustrate the merits and gaps in care related to the management of CDI in the elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 139 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 18%
Student > Master 19 14%
Other 14 10%
Researcher 12 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 8%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 38 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 5%
Other 18 13%
Unknown 45 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,582,879
of 21,200,018 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#180
of 1,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,782
of 340,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#10
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,200,018 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,755 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,645 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.