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Role of magnetic resonance planimetry and magnetic resonance parkinsonism index in discriminating Parkinson’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy: a retrospective study based on 1.5 and 3 T MRI

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of General Medicine, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Role of magnetic resonance planimetry and magnetic resonance parkinsonism index in discriminating Parkinson’s disease and progressive supranuclear palsy: a retrospective study based on 1.5 and 3 T MRI
Published in
International Journal of General Medicine, October 2017
DOI 10.2147/ijgm.s134297
Pubmed ID
Authors

Waseem Mehmood Nizamani, Fatima Mubarak, Muhammad Danish Barakzai, Muhammad Saad Ahmed

Abstract

The objective of the study was to assess magnetic resonance (MR) planimetric measurements and MR parkinsonism index (MRPI) in differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) from Parkinson's disease (PD) using 1.5 and 3 T MRI scanner. After ethical approval was obtained, analysis of 34 consecutive patients with PSP, 34 patients with PD and 34 healthy controls (HCs) was performed. HCs were age-matched adults without any history of neurodegenerative disease or movement disorders. Retrospective data from the past 10 years (from January 2006 to December 2015) were obtained from the Hospital Information Management System, and informed consent was obtained from all participants. The measurements of pons area-midbrain area ratio (P/M) and MCP width-superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP) width ratio (MCP/SCP) were used, and MRPI was calculated by the formula ([P/M]×[MCP/SCP]). Midbrain area and SCP width in patients with PSP (19 males, 15 females; mean age =66.7 years) were significantly (P<0.001) smaller than in patients with PD (20 males, 14 females; mean age =66.7 years) and control participants (17 males, 17 females; mean age =66.1 years). P/M and MCP/SCP were significantly higher in patients with PSP than in patients with PD and control participants. All measurements showed some overlap of values between patients with PSP and patients from PD group and control participants. MRPI value was significantly higher in patients with PSP (mean 21.00) than in patients with PD (mean 9.50; P<0.001) and control participants (mean 9.6; P<0.001), without any overlap of values among groups. No correlation was found between the duration of disease, PSP rating scale, PSP staging system and MRPI in this study. No patient with PSP received a misdiagnosis when the index was used (sensitivity and specificity, 100%). MRPI should be made an essential part of all MRI brain reporting whenever differentiation between PD and PSP is sought for.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Other 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 13%
Psychology 2 13%
Computer Science 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 5 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,519,430
of 12,077,989 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of General Medicine
#159
of 402 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,886
of 284,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of General Medicine
#6
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,077,989 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 402 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,695 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.