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The contribution of symptoms and comorbidities to the economic impact of COPD: an analysis of the German COSYCONET cohort

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, December 2017
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
Title
The contribution of symptoms and comorbidities to the economic impact of COPD: an analysis of the German COSYCONET cohort
Published in
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, December 2017
DOI 10.2147/copd.s141852
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margarethe Wacker, Katharina Kitzing, Rudolf Jörres, Reiner Leidl, Holger Schulz, Stefan Karrasch, Annika Karch, Armin Koch, Claus Vogelmeier, Rolf Holle

Abstract

Although patients with COPD often have various comorbidities and symptoms, limited data are available on the contribution of these aspects to health care costs. This study analyzes the association of frequent comorbidities and common symptoms with the annual direct and indirect costs of patients with COPD. Self-reported information on 33 potential comorbidities and symptoms (dyspnea, cough, and sputum) of 2,139 participants from the baseline examination of the German COPD cohort COSYCONET was used. Direct and indirect costs were calculated based on self-reported health care utilization, work absence, and retirement. The association of comorbidities, symptoms, and COPD stage with annual direct/indirect costs was assessed by generalized linear regression models. Additional models analyzed possible interactions between COPD stage, the number of comorbidities, and dyspnea. Unadjusted mean annual direct costs were €7,263 per patient. Other than COPD stage, a high level of dyspnea showed the strongest driving effect on direct costs (+33%). Among the comorbidities, osteoporosis (+38%), psychiatric disorders (+36%), heart disease (+25%), cancer (+24%), and sleep apnea (+21%) were associated with the largest increase in direct costs (p<0.01). A sub-additive interaction between advanced COPD stage and a high number of comorbidities reduced the independent cost-driving effects of these factors. For indirect costs, besides dyspnea (+34%), only psychiatric disorders (+32%) and age (+62% per 10 years) were identified as significant drivers of costs (p<0.04). In the subsequent interaction analysis, a high number of comorbidities was found to be a more crucial factor for increased indirect costs than single comorbidities. Detailed knowledge about comorbidities in COPD is useful not only for clinical purposes but also to identify relevant cost factors and their interactions and to establish a ranking of major cost drivers. This could help in focusing therapeutic efforts on both clinically and economically important comorbidities in COPD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 89 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 30 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Psychology 4 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 35 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2018.
All research outputs
#13,852,167
of 21,338,015 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#1,353
of 2,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#254,439
of 443,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
#39
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,338,015 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,222 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 443,907 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.