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Optimizing iron delivery in the management of anemia: patient considerations and the role of ferric carboxymaltose

Overview of attention for article published in Drug Design, Development and Therapy, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
Title
Optimizing iron delivery in the management of anemia: patient considerations and the role of ferric carboxymaltose
Published in
Drug Design, Development and Therapy, December 2014
DOI 10.2147/dddt.s55499
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jorge Toblli, Margarita Angerosa

Abstract

With the challenge of optimizing iron delivery, new intravenous (iv) iron-carbohydrate complexes have been developed in the last few years. A good example of these new compounds is ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), which has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in adult patients who are intolerant to oral iron or present an unsatisfactory response to oral iron, and in adult patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD). FCM is a robust and stable complex similar to ferritin, which minimizes the release of labile iron during administration, allowing higher doses to be administered in a single application and with a favorable cost-effective rate. Cumulative information from randomized, controlled, multicenter trials on a diverse range of indications, including patients with chronic heart failure, postpartum anemia/abnormal uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, NDD-CKD, and those undergoing hemodialysis, supports the efficacy of FCM for iron replacement in patients with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia. Furthermore, as FCM is a dextran-free iron-carbohydrate complex (which has a very low risk for hypersensitivity reactions) with a small proportion of the reported adverse effects in a large number of subjects who received FCM, it may be considered a safe drug. Therefore, FCM appears as an interesting option to apply high doses of iron as a single infusion in a few minutes in order to obtain the quick replacement of iron stores. The present review on FCM summarizes diverse aspects such as pharmacology characteristics and analyzes trials on the efficacy/safety of FCM versus oral iron and different iv iron compounds in multiple clinical scenarios. Additionally, the information on cost effectiveness and data on change in quality of life are also discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 17%
Student > Master 20 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 9%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 17 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 34%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 8%
Other 17 14%
Unknown 17 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2021.
All research outputs
#5,454,349
of 17,932,315 outputs
Outputs from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#336
of 1,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,133
of 315,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drug Design, Development and Therapy
#14
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,932,315 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,774 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 315,858 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.