↓ Skip to main content

Dove Medical Press

Article Metrics

The burden of family caregiving in the United States: work productivity, health care resource utilization, and mental health among employed adults

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, December 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 758)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
Title
The burden of family caregiving in the United States: work productivity, health care resource utilization, and mental health among employed adults
Published in
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare, December 2017
DOI 10.2147/jmdh.s135372
Pubmed ID
Authors

Markay Hopps, Laura Iadeluca, Margaret McDonald, Geoffrey T Makinson

Abstract

Family caregiving is an increasingly important component of care for patients and the elderly. The aim of this study is to characterize the burden of family caregiving among employed adults. Employed adults (≥18 years) from the 2013 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS) were classified as family caregivers if they reported currently caring for at least one adult relative. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance assessed whether employed caregivers, weighted to the US population, differed from employed non-caregivers on behavioral characteristics, workplace productivity, and health care resource utilization. Eight million workers were family caregivers in the United States, more often female than male (51% vs. 49%, P < 0.05), and 53% were between 40 and 64 years of age. Eighteen percent of caregivers were Hispanic compared with 15% of non-caregivers (P < 0.05). Similar behavioral characteristics between caregivers and non-caregivers included daily alcohol consumption (6% vs. 5%) and lack of vigorous exercise (25% vs. 29%), but caregivers had a higher prevalence of smoking (26% vs. 19%, P < 0.05). Caregivers reported a higher mean percentage of work time missed (8% vs. 4%, P < 0.05) and greater productivity impairment (24% vs. 14%, P < 0.05). Some form of depression was reported by 53% of caregivers compared with 32% of non-caregivers (P < 0.05), and more caregivers had self-reported insomnia than non-caregivers (46% vs. 37%, P < 0.05). The number of self-reported diagnosed comorbidities was higher among caregivers compared with that of non-caregivers (5.0 vs. 3.1, P < 0.05), as was the mean number of outpatient visits in the previous 6 months (4.1 vs. 2.7, P < 0.05). Family caregiving is associated with a multidimensional burden that impacts caregivers and has implications for employers and the health care system. Clinicians and employers need to recognize and understand this burden. Characterization of caregivers as reported in this study can inform development of targeted programs to help mitigate the burden.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 111 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 15%
Student > Master 17 15%
Researcher 11 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 29 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 17%
Social Sciences 14 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 12%
Psychology 9 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 4%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 37 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2022.
All research outputs
#1,706,804
of 21,972,331 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#46
of 758 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,814
of 447,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare
#2
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,972,331 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 758 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 447,343 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.