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Prevention and treatment of acute and chronic radiodermatitis

Overview of attention for article published in Breast cancer targets and therapy, November 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
Title
Prevention and treatment of acute and chronic radiodermatitis
Published in
Breast cancer targets and therapy, November 2017
DOI 10.2147/bctt.s149752
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Seité, René-Jean Bensadoun, Jean-Michel Mazer

Abstract

More than half the number of patients with cancer, who are treated with radiotherapy, will have radiodermatitis at some point during their treatment. Radiodermatitis either occurs early on in the treatment period or appears months or up to several years later. Acute radiodermatitis is a burn injury that varies in severity according to both treatment and inherent patient factors. Most acute radiodermatitis reactions resolve after several weeks but some reactions persist and can cause complications. Late-onset radiodermatitis is characterized by telangiectasia that forms on atrophic and fragile skin. These radiodermatitis reactions can have a significant negative impact on concomitant and subsequent therapeutic protocols and most particularly on the patient's quality of life. Today, treatment of radiodermatitis reactions is in its infancy. Although there is insufficient evidence available to form recommendations that would prevent or reduce radiodermatitis, some advances have been made using low level light therapy (LLLT) or vascular lasers to control the symptoms. Some recent preclinical and clinical research suggests that LLLT has biostimulating properties which allow the tissues to regenerate and heal faster, reduce inflammation, and prevent fibrosis. Also, in late-onset radiodermatitis pulsed dye laser treatment has been shown to be beneficial in clearing radiation-induced telangiectasia. In the absence of evidence-based recommendations, the objective of this paper is to review how to prevent or manage the symptoms of radiodermatitis reactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 18%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Engineering 3 5%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 17 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,960,339
of 16,367,518 outputs
Outputs from Breast cancer targets and therapy
#103
of 189 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,909
of 413,252 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast cancer targets and therapy
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,367,518 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 189 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 413,252 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.